Taking Your Chances

by in CodeSOD on

A few months ago, Sean had some tasks around building a front-end for some dashboards. Someone on the team picked a UI library for managing their widgets. It had lovely features like handling flexible grid layouts, collapsing/expanding components, making components full screen and even drag-and-drop widget rearrangement.

It was great, until one day it wasn't. As more and more people started using the front end, they kept getting more and more reports about broken dashboards, misrendering, duplicated widgets, and all sorts of other difficult to explain bugs. These were bugs which Sean and the other developers had a hard time replicating, and even on the rare occassions that they did replicate it, they couldn't do it twice in a row.


The Watchdog Hydra

by in Feature Articles on

Ammar A uses Node to consume an HTTP API. The API uses cookies to track session information, and ensures those cookies expire, so clients need to periodically re-authenticate. How frequently?

That's an excellent question, and one that neither Ammar nor the docs for this API can answer. The documentation provides all the clarity and consistency of a religious document, which is to say you need to take it on faith that these seemingly random expirations happen for a good reason.


Where to go, Next?

by in Error'd on

"In this screenshot, 'Lyckades' means 'Succeeded' and the buttons say 'Try again' and 'Cancel'. There is no 'Next' button," wrote Martin W.


A Generic Comment

by in CodeSOD on

To my mind, code comments are important to explain why the code what it does, not so much what it does. Ideally, the what is clear enough from the code that you don’t have to. Today, we have no code, but we have some comments.

Chris recently was reviewing some C# code from 2016, and found a little conversation in the comments, which may or may not explain whats or whys. Line numbers included for, ahem context.


A Random While

by in CodeSOD on

A bit ago, Aurelia shared with us a backwards for loop. Code which wasn’t wrong, but was just… weird. Well, now we’ve got some code which is just plain wrong, in a number of ways.

The goal of the following Java code is to generate some number of random numbers between 1 and 9, and pass them off to a space-separated file.


A Cutt Above

by in CodeSOD on

We just discussed ViewState last week, and that may have inspired Russell F to share with us this little snippet.

private ConcurrentQueue<AppointmentCuttOff> lstAppointmentCuttOff { get { object o = ViewState["lstAppointmentCuttOff"]; if (o == null) return null; else return (ConcurrentQueue<AppointmentCuttOff>)o; } set { ViewState["lstAppointmentCuttOff"] = value; } }

Exceptional Standards Compliance

by in CodeSOD on

When we're laying out code standards and policies, we are, in many ways, relying on "policing by consent". We are trying to establish standards for behavior among our developers, but we can only do this with their consent. This means our standards have to have clear value, have to be applied fairly and equally. The systems we build to enforce those standards are meant to reduce conflict and de-escalate disagreements, not create them.

But that doesn't mean there won't always be developers who resist following the agreed upon standards. Take, for example, Daniel's co-worker. Their CI process also runs a static analysis step against their C# code, which lets them enforce a variety of coding standards.


Just a Trial Run

by in Error'd on

"How does Netflix save money when making their original series? It's simple. They just use trial versions of VFX software," Nick L. wrote.


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